‘Making A Difference’ A Student View of Excellent Teaching

The dataset presented in this report comprises the recorded perceptions of approximately 4,000 students in Irish higher education regarding the characteristics, behaviours and skills associated with exceptional teachers; it also provides evidence of the impact of exceptional teachers on their students. The report includes a dialogue between insights from the student data and insights from the teachers they view as exceptional.

Understanding and Enabling Student Success in Irish Higher Education

This publication looks at student success through three lenses. Firstly, it explores the concept of student success from the key perspectives of national policy, the explicit strategic missions of our higher education institutions (HEIs), our students and international literature. It then explores a range of themes that have been pivotal to our understanding of student success and how it can be supported. Finally, it looks at the development of an Irish national understanding of student success.

Ireland’s National Professional Development Framework Summary Findings of the Initial Implementation

Ireland’s first national professional development framework (PD Framework) for all who teach in
Irish higher education was launched in 2016, following a period of extensive consultation across
the sector. An initial implementation (pilot study) was conducted during the academic year 2016-
2017, involving 230 staff from universities, institutes of technology and private colleges across 22
groups. This report presents findings from this initial implementation stage of the PD Framework.

Profile of Assessment Practices in Irish Higher Education

This report aims to inform the current enhancement theme of the National Forum by profiling documented assessment practices across a sample of 30 undergraduate degree programmes. Further, the study aims to explore whether and how assessment practices differ between fields of study and to share insights regarding students’ experiences of assessment across Irish higher education.

Reaching Out: Why Students Leave

This briefing paper reports on a research project established by the National Forum in partnership with the Union of Students in Ireland, which aimed to inform our understanding of why some students do not progress to the completion of their programmes of study in higher education and to determine how best to support students in their transitions into and through higher education. The study examined, through surveys and interviews, the motivations and experiences of 331 students who did not complete their programmes of study in higher education. The briefing paper adds to the growing evidence base about the challenges that students face in their transitions into and through higher education in Ireland.

Student Non-Completion on ICT Programmes

This report is based on findings from a National Forum-funded research project on student non-completion on ICT programmes led by a team based at the University of Limerick.

The Paper summarises international literature on student non-completion with a focus on students of ICT ; it outlines proven initiatives and pedagogic practices designed to tackle ICT student non-completion and it presents the results of exploratory case study research on ICT non-completion at the University of Limerick. It also includes further considerations arising specifically from the institutional case study as well as those arising more generally from the question of non-completion in the Irish context.

Teaching for Transitions: A Review of Teaching for Transitions Related Teaching and Learning Activity and Research

The National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning commissioned this study of scholarship that focuses on ‘Teaching for Transitions’, with particular reference to higher education in Ireland. An international element was included to allow some benchmarking with national scholarship. The question ‘how can this scholarship be more impactful on the practice of teachers in the higher education sector?’ was a key question of interest in the project. Part 1 of the study is reported here. It sets out early results and insights and makes recommendations based on investigations carried out between January and June 2015. It raises questions for further investigation.